“Large groups still remain”

According to the theologian Franz-Josef Bormann, politicians should improve their communication on the subject of vaccination. It must be clear to citizens what situations they have to be prepared for, the theologian said.

I find a "competition of some politicians for good headlines unfortunate," he said on Tuesday at tagesschau.de. If the prioritized groups are vaccinated through, there will still be "a large group" that cannot be vaccinated within a short period of time.

There are two scenarios for this situation, said Bormann. Either it remains up to the decency of the individual whether one participates in the "run on the available vaccine" or gives way to particularly burdened groups. Or even this phase of the vaccination would have to be "structured again". Politics must clarify what situation citizens have to adjust to, demanded the scientist, who is a member of the German Ethics Council.

Be calm

At the moment, "many administrative details" in vaccination practice are poorly organized. This leads to breakdowns and in some people to the impression that everyone else is looking for loopholes.

Bormann advised calmness: "Even if there are undoubtedly these cases of abuse: The vast majority of people are still not vaccinated."Moreover, no one has anything to gain from the fact that vaccinated people do not get their freedoms back. "You can also turn the view to the positive and say: I'm waiting for my vaccination appointment and I'm happy with those who have already been vaccinated and thus pushed the vaccination campaign forward."

Solidarity for others

Solidarity is always important, and in all directions, the moral theologian emphasized. "However, solidarity and the duties that come with it must always have a factual basis. So it doesn't help to say everyone must be in solidarity with everyone and there must be no change."

To maintain the restrictions for all until all had received an offer of vaccination, he rejected: "That would be an abuse of the solidarity argument." As long as vaccine is in short supply, prioritization is needed, he said. "And for the same reasons, if the factual reason for prioritization ceases to exist at some point, it must also be clear in reverse that people can again make use of their civil rights."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *